Serious Collaboration

On February 18, the Perseverance rover landed on the surface of Mars. After traveling for seven long months, the robot touched down in a crater, ready to hunt for signs of ancient life. Days later, learners watched the dramatic video-recorded landing, heard the researchers’ cheers when the rover landed safely, and listened to scientists talk about what they hoped to find.

For the culminating activity that week, learners were invited to put themselves in the shoes of space explorers and build their own robots. After taking a video tour of Perseverance and seeing all its working parts, they were given access to boxes, glue, markers, and so on. Away they went! The learners assembled cardboard pieces with plastic screws, glued craft sticks on the sides, poked pipe cleaners through to decorate, etc. They made cameras, lasers, chutes for materials, and even hiding places for people.

While the learners worked to create the robots of their dreams, the guides had some ulterior motives for this activity. This was yet another opportunity for them to practice their expanding collaborative skills. They shared ideas, took turns, and shared tools. “Can I have the screwdriver when you’re done?” “Can I have the tape after you’ve finished?” “Can you help me use the poking tool?” These requests flowed effortlessly from heroes’ mouths, in contrast to the sometimes contentious interactions that took place in the first part of the year. Even when minor arguments did arise, it was amazing to watch other learners step in to stand up for one another, issue reminders, and correct problems.

This was also a chance to practice their independence. Occasionally, someone had a hard time figuring out a tool, poking all the way through their cardboard, or ripping the tape. Rather than ask a guide for help, they sought out others who had struggled with similar issues or solved the problems already. Or sometimes guides offered suggestions for how the learners could do it themselves. “Have you tried holding your hand this way?” “What happens when you grip the tape here?” Rather than learning to depend on adults, learners showed that they are gradually coming to rely on themselves and one another.

Spark learners had a blast letting their imaginations and creativity run wild. They also got some valuable lessons in teamwork, as they do every day here at The Village School. Who knows, maybe some of them will explore Mars in the future!  

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